MOSSLESS: Do you consider your work to be documentary photography?
Morgan Ashcom: To me, the word documentary implies a primary concern with things as they are: concern with the social landscape, psychology, politics, history, or activism. I don’t think of my work in that way at all. I am a photographer, and that’s it. Elements of the scene at Skatopia provided some useful dramatic material, but they serve a different purpose in West of Megsico than they do at Skatopia. The resulting photographs and their sequencing came from a mixture of imagination, observation, and my experience. I work like this because I am interested in looking at photographs in a way that includes the most possibilities. That is, I like them to appear as facts, while at the same time suggesting something beyond the visible world.
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MOSSLESS: Do you consider your work to be documentary photography?

Morgan Ashcom: To me, the word documentary implies a primary concern with things as they are: concern with the social landscape, psychology, politics, history, or activism. I don’t think of my work in that way at all. I am a photographer, and that’s it. Elements of the scene at Skatopia provided some useful dramatic material, but they serve a different purpose in West of Megsico than they do at Skatopia. The resulting photographs and their sequencing came from a mixture of imagination, observation, and my experience. I work like this because I am interested in looking at photographs in a way that includes the most possibilities. That is, I like them to appear as facts, while at the same time suggesting something beyond the visible world.

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MOSSLESS: You mention in your artist statement that a lot of the settlements you photograph would be ghost towns if it weren’t for their Latino populations. What are these towns like?
Kathya Landeros: The part of California where I am from is some of the most fertile land in our country, making the people who tend to it (a majority being Latino) quite productive. The land is very flat, and yet there is always evidence of rolling foothills and mountains never too far away. The sun also seems to produce the most intense heat and light here—really beautiful California light. This is especially true in the summer when the sun is high and its light is drawn out late into the evening. The land is usually laid out in a similar rectilinear fashion: a main business drag with homes surrounding it. The homes are enveloped by expansive farmland, which is the most defining feature that can be seen from the highway. When I think of these towns the paintings of Richard Diebenkorn and some of the other Bay Area Figurative Movement painters come to mind. Although their work is not specific to the towns I am photographing in, their rendition of light and geometry very much describes the West I know. Such a quiet view of the land also offers an interesting foil to the mythos of the rugged American West of cowboys. 
Read more

MOSSLESS: You mention in your artist statement that a lot of the settlements you photograph would be ghost towns if it weren’t for their Latino populations. What are these towns like?

Kathya Landeros: The part of California where I am from is some of the most fertile land in our country, making the people who tend to it (a majority being Latino) quite productive. The land is very flat, and yet there is always evidence of rolling foothills and mountains never too far away. The sun also seems to produce the most intense heat and light here—really beautiful California light. This is especially true in the summer when the sun is high and its light is drawn out late into the evening. The land is usually laid out in a similar rectilinear fashion: a main business drag with homes surrounding it. The homes are enveloped by expansive farmland, which is the most defining feature that can be seen from the highway. When I think of these towns the paintings of Richard Diebenkorn and some of the other Bay Area Figurative Movement painters come to mind. Although their work is not specific to the towns I am photographing in, their rendition of light and geometry very much describes the West I know. Such a quiet view of the land also offers an interesting foil to the mythos of the rugged American West of cowboys. 

Read more





We are interviewing a number of photographers from Issue 3 for Vice Magazine online. They will be posted every monday and we will reblog a snippet of each here.
MOSSLESS: Tell us a memorable story from your travels across America.
Curran Hatleberg: A while back I was sitting in an empty barroom looking out the entrance to a dirty street. The door was propped wide open, framing a perfect view of the foot traffic and cars streaming by in the night. I studied thousands of insects as they whirled and smashed into a streetlight. I watched a nervous, skinny woman flash her gold teeth, then drop an orange rind on the sidewalk. Then I saw a sedan meet a concrete pillar at 50 miles an hour. The car lurched up the pole with vicious agility, going completely vertical before landing upside down. The whole event appeared slow and graceful and very far away. I stared, inactive, for what felt like a very long time, trying to decide if what I saw had actually happened or not. Before I was aware of my movements I was on my knees, breathing hard at the driver’s side window. Everything smelled like gas. Glass and debris was strewn everywhere like confetti. Looking inside, the driver had blood streaming down his face in squiggled paths and was laughing uncontrollably. With the help of another man, I dragged him by the arms out of the window and onto the grass. The driver writhed on the ground in spastic fits of energy. A crowd developed around him, unsure what to do. It all happened very fast, but I clearly remember standing up and seeing one of the car’s tires spinning purposely, as if the road were still underneath it.
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We are interviewing a number of photographers from Issue 3 for Vice Magazine online. They will be posted every monday and we will reblog a snippet of each here.

MOSSLESS: Tell us a memorable story from your travels across America.

Curran HatlebergA while back I was sitting in an empty barroom looking out the entrance to a dirty street. The door was propped wide open, framing a perfect view of the foot traffic and cars streaming by in the night. I studied thousands of insects as they whirled and smashed into a streetlight. I watched a nervous, skinny woman flash her gold teeth, then drop an orange rind on the sidewalk. Then I saw a sedan meet a concrete pillar at 50 miles an hour. The car lurched up the pole with vicious agility, going completely vertical before landing upside down. The whole event appeared slow and graceful and very far away. I stared, inactive, for what felt like a very long time, trying to decide if what I saw had actually happened or not. Before I was aware of my movements I was on my knees, breathing hard at the driver’s side window. Everything smelled like gas. Glass and debris was strewn everywhere like confetti. Looking inside, the driver had blood streaming down his face in squiggled paths and was laughing uncontrollably. With the help of another man, I dragged him by the arms out of the window and onto the grass. The driver writhed on the ground in spastic fits of energy. A crowd developed around him, unsure what to do. It all happened very fast, but I clearly remember standing up and seeing one of the car’s tires spinning purposely, as if the road were still underneath it.

Read more





mossfull:

Our Kickstarter is up. See the almost whole book in the video above.

Issue Three: The United States (2003-2013) is now available for preorder.

1 Jan 2014 Reblogged from mossfull with





A special (last-minute) video preview of a selection of photographers from Issue 3! This video was made by our friend Pablo Chea and the music is by Flako. Originally posted on itsnicethat.

(this video was originally posted on the second last day of our Kickstarter campaign)





Verstoppertje by Romke Hoogwaerts and Grace Leigh is now available at our online store for just $10.

It was exclusively made for the 8 Ball Zine Fair at an edition of 20. We have just a few copies left. The photos are from our month in The Netherlands last year, and it is the first time we have published our own work.





Laurie Kang is 28 and drinking green tea.


MOSSLESS: What kind of paper did you make these collages with?LAURIE KANG: I used a variety of chromogenic (colour photography) paper. Different brands, stocks, finishes…some were expired, some exposed more than others. Most of it was given to me and would have otherwise been discarded. Some of the collages are torn and others are photograms I made using natural light or the light of the scanner. The physical collages remain light-sensitive and will change over time.


ML: So are you anti-digital?LK: Not at all. I’m interested in the sensitivity of the paper’s surface. The idea of flux embedded in the material, and the colours and textures revealed through my mis-use of it is a potent metaphor for many things. I don’t mean to solely address analog photography and I embrace all aspects of the medium in my overall practice. I’ll use what works best for the given project. 


ML: Our second issue had a number of Canadian artists. You’re from Toronto but you studied in Montreal. Who’s got the better art scene?LK: Never been much of a “vs” type… there’s great work coming from both.


ML: You’re now attending Bard for your MFA. How’s life there?LK: It’s a tough but rewarding program. I just started so ask me again in a few years!

33 Circles is out now

Laurie Kang is 28 and drinking green tea.

MOSSLESS: What kind of paper did you make these collages with?
LAURIE KANG: I used a variety of chromogenic (colour photography) paper. Different brands, stocks, finishes…some were expired, some exposed more than others. Most of it was given to me and would have otherwise been discarded. Some of the collages are torn and others are photograms I made using natural light or the light of the scanner. The physical collages remain light-sensitive and will change over time.

ML: So are you anti-digital?
LK: Not at all. I’m interested in the sensitivity of the paper’s surface. The idea of flux embedded in the material, and the colours and textures revealed through my mis-use of it is a potent metaphor for many things. I don’t mean to solely address analog photography and I embrace all aspects of the medium in my overall practice. I’ll use what works best for the given project. 

ML: Our second issue had a number of Canadian artists. You’re from Toronto but you studied in Montreal. Who’s got the better art scene?
LK: Never been much of a “vs” type… there’s great work coming from both.

ML: You’re now attending Bard for your MFA. How’s life there?
LK: It’s a tough but rewarding program. I just started so ask me again in a few years!

33 Circles is out now




Laurie Kang’s 33 Circles is now available at our online store.





Mark King is 30 and not that tall.

MOSSLESS: Let’s talk about how this started as a comment on one of your Flickr images. What were your feelings back then about the possibility of making a book with us? MARK KING: I was very active on Flickr and Tumblr back then. They were the best options available to emerging photographers looking for ways of getting work out into the world. I spent many hours submitting photos to various blog/magazine group pools on Flickr with hopes of being featured on their sites and Tumblrs. It was a strategy that was working rather well for me. It didn’t result in any commissions but I was getting featured and connecting with many talented people around the world and being offered group exhibition and residency opportunities.
While preparing for an artist residency at the Frans Masereel Centrum in Kasterlee, Belgium in early 2011, I moved my portraiture in a new direction. I was going for a screen printing residency and felt that the style portraiture I was known for at the time would not be a good fit. I had a couple packs of expired black and white high speed Polaroids that my friend Abby gifted me on a recent trip to San Francisco and my friend and model, Simone was in Barbados for a few weeks so we went for a late night photo excursion. I really liked what we came up with and submitted a few of the images to a few select Flickr groups. I really enjoyed reading the Mossless interviews and had aspired to someday do one of these. I figured there was nothing to lose and submitted an image to your Flickr pool.A few days later I received a message from Romke letting me know that the image was featured on the Mossless Tumblr. In a later message he encouraged me to shoot more in that style. A few months would pass and he would check back in urging me to get my shit together and shoot more. This went on for a while. Romke and I would meet up for a beer in March of 2012 while I was in New York on vacation. My buddy was with me and I remember telling him that I had a feeling Romke was going to ask that we collaborate on a book for Plastic and that I would say yes. I had seen images from the first issue of Mossless online and was very impressed. It was a no brainer really.

ML: What’s the environmental scene like in Barbados? Are plastic bags just lying around like in New York?MK: Barbados is a lush place for the most part. It’s quite built up for such a small island, but it’s still easy to get away from the hotels, villas, and housing communities and lose yourself in the island’s natural beauty. And yes those plastic bags are everywhere. We don’t have a terrible litter problem though I can safely say they these bags are everywhere. They’re hard to miss. That’s what made me so enamored with them.
 ML: Can you tell us how you made these photographs?MK: The project was captured on a Mamiya RZ 67 medium format camera with a 127 mm lens and an instant film back. The portraits were taken at night using available street lighting. They were shot on Fuji FP-3000B black and white high speed instant film that was scanned and later tinted in Photoshop by overlaying blended colors based off of local shopping bags. The subjects are a mix of good friends, acquaintances, friends of friends, and family members. 
ML: Where do Bajan people go on their holidays?MK: New York, London, Miami, Trinidad & Tobago, Toronto, and St. Lucia are popular.

Mark King is 30 and not that tall.

MOSSLESS: Let’s talk about how this started as a comment on one of your Flickr images. What were your feelings back then about the possibility of making a book with us? 
MARK KING: I was very active on Flickr and Tumblr back then. They were the best options available to emerging photographers looking for ways of getting work out into the world. I spent many hours submitting photos to various blog/magazine group pools on Flickr with hopes of being featured on their sites and Tumblrs. It was a strategy that was working rather well for me. It didn’t result in any commissions but I was getting featured and connecting with many talented people around the world and being offered group exhibition and residency opportunities.

While preparing for an artist residency at the Frans Masereel Centrum in Kasterlee, Belgium in early 2011, I moved my portraiture in a new direction. I was going for a screen printing residency and felt that the style portraiture I was known for at the time would not be a good fit. I had a couple packs of expired black and white high speed Polaroids that my friend Abby gifted me on a recent trip to San Francisco and my friend and model, Simone was in Barbados for a few weeks so we went for a late night photo excursion. I really liked what we came up with and submitted a few of the images to a few select Flickr groups. 

I really enjoyed reading the Mossless interviews and had aspired to someday do one of these. I figured there was nothing to lose and submitted an image to your Flickr pool.

A few days later I received a message from Romke letting me know that the image was featured on the Mossless Tumblr. In a later message he encouraged me to shoot more in that style. A few months would pass and he would check back in urging me to get my shit together and shoot more. This went on for a while. Romke and I would meet up for a beer in March of 2012 while I was in New York on vacation. My buddy was with me and I remember telling him that I had a feeling Romke was going to ask that we collaborate on a book for Plastic and that I would say yes. I had seen images from the first issue of Mossless online and was very impressed. It was a no brainer really.

ML: What’s the environmental scene like in Barbados? Are plastic bags just lying around like in New York?
MK: Barbados is a lush place for the most part. It’s quite built up for such a small island, but it’s still easy to get away from the hotels, villas, and housing communities and lose yourself in the island’s natural beauty. And yes those plastic bags are everywhere. We don’t have a terrible litter problem though I can safely say they these bags are everywhere. They’re hard to miss. That’s what made me so enamored with them.
 
ML: Can you tell us how you made these photographs?
MK: The project was captured on a Mamiya RZ 67 medium format camera with a 127 mm lens and an instant film back. The portraits were taken at night using available street lighting. They were shot on Fuji FP-3000B black and white high speed instant film that was scanned and later tinted in Photoshop by overlaying blended colors based off of local shopping bags. The subjects are a mix of good friends, acquaintances, friends of friends, and family members. 

ML: Where do Bajan people go on their holidays?
MK: New York, London, Miami, Trinidad & Tobago, Toronto, and St. Lucia are popular.




Mark King, Plastic, 2013

Now available at our online storeGet it signed at the Newsstand on Sunday.